New Study Says Not Exercising Could Be More Dangerous Than Smoking

View of a woman's feet as she walks on a treadmill

We know smoking’s bad for us and puts us at risk of illness and disease. But it turns out, not exercising could actually be worse.

A recent study from the Journal of American Medical Association Network Open (JAMA) has found that inactivity and a lack of cardio training could shorten your life and even lead to illnesses like diabetes.

The study analyzed data collected over a 23-year-period from more than 100,000 individuals. Overall, it was found that those with better physical fitness were associated with longer lives. It also found that, the fitter you are, the better the benefits.

They separated participants into different groups, which were defined by their aerobic performance. These were elite, high, above average, below average and low.

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They found that, when an individual in the elite category passed the age of 70, they had a 30 percent high chance of avoiding mortality than those ranked ‘high’ – the next highest category.

Upon further research, they found that inactivity is worse for the body than killers like smoking, high cholesterol and diabetes.

The findings are both interesting and concerning. Scientists behind the study have called for action and have even suggested that doctors prescribe exercise to patients who are suffering from the symptoms of inactivity.

It doesn’t necessarily mean you have to turn elite or pound the treadmill for hours on end to live a longer happier life. The key here girl is to keep up that hard work, stay fit and always push yourself. Add a few more cardio sessions into your regular routine and future you will thank you for it.

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